As a company officer, you no longer drive the apparatus—but that doesn't mean you don't play an integral part in getting the vehicle to the call. Steve Marsar looks at how the officer can and should play a role in emergency vehicle response.

An apparatus check involves checking all four sides, right? Think again. Homer Robertson presents the seven sides of a thorough apparatus check when you’re leaving the incident scene.

Despite advances in technology and apparatus safety features, backing a fire apparatus is still a dangerous task. Capt. Homer Robertson provides 20 tips to review with your crew to help ensure the next accident doesn’t involve your apparatus.

When a reader writes to Nozzlehead, explaining that he feels that we have too many warning lights on fire apparatus, Nozzlehead offers him a piece of his mind, arguing that in many cases, there’s hardly such a thing as “too many lights.” In this second installment, Nozzlehead looks at the science behind apparatus warning lights.
Safety & Health

When a reader writes to Nozzlehead, explaining that he feels that we have too many warning lights on fire apparatus, Nozzlehead offers him a piece of his mind, arguing that there’s hardly such a thing as “too many lights” when it comes to responding but that there can be too many lights when apparatus are stationary and simply need to convey caution to passing motorists.

Homer Robertson offers advice for how and when to properly inspect your apparatus in order to keep you and your crew safe when responding to and from incidents.

FAMA study documents how improvement in fire equipment help save lives